Two decades on this planet, also Doom turns eighteen

I suppose this is quite significant to my life so I think I’ll make a blog post about it.

Probably.

(Late by ten days though it is.)

(Also that cake wasn’t mine.)

On November 30, 2011, I celebrated the 20th anniversary of my inception into this world. Two decades. 20 years. 240 months. 1,040 weeks. 7,305 days. 175,320 hours. 10,519,200 minutes. 631,152,000 seconds.

But really, it doesn’t matter how that length of time is phrased – it just doesn’t feel like it’s been that long at all. I may have existed for two whole decades, but I certainly don’t feel as though I have the same amount of experience as your average person of 20 years. I still feel like a young’un, yet my self-image should surely have graduated to “adult” when I officially became an adult two entire years ago.

I think that may be because, as I think it’s safe to say, I’ve led a rather sheltered life. I’ve spent most of my time cooped up in my comfort zone, fiddling about making music and playing games that are nearly as old as me. I haven’t exercised any of the new rights and privileges that come with being a slightly older person. I’ve not voted yet – I tend to stay as far away from the trainwreck that is our current political system as possible. I don’t drink at all – alcoholic beverages of any kind just revulse me for reasons I can’t really explain. I still can’t be trusted to drive a vehicle – lessons were taken but I soon proved to devolve into a brainless klutz whenever put in front of the wheel of a car. And you probably couldn’t give less of a shit about my sexual experiences but let’s just say they have not been that many.

My parents have gone well out of their way to make sure no unnecessary hardship should come upon me or my brother. One of the major reasons we emmigrated was to ensure we both had a good chance of further education and to open up a myriad of new opportunites, after the UK proved to be rather limited and less-than-enthralling, what with the state of decline its economy is now in.

In the coming years I’m going to try and be as responsible and outwardly proactive as possible. In the twenty years to follow, I’m going to find wealth, knowledge, love, and happiness through whatever means I possibly can. And I’m going to (try and) do it with as little help as possible.

Anyway, that’s enough of me ranting about the obstacles I’ll have to face throughout my continuing existence on this Earth. Let’s talk about something that matters a little less, shall we? 😀

Today, Doom turned 18. At least in the UK, it, like myself, is of the age where it can legally vote, drink, drive and procreate (though let’s hope not at the same time, or those privileges might well get revoked fast).

18 years ago today, the game that would forever change the face of computer gaming and set the standard for survival horror games was uploaded to the FTP server of the University of Wisconsin, and was immediately set upon by zealous gamers who, in their frantic bid to get an early copy of the game, crashed the server.

Let’s face it, Doom is arguably the best videogame of all time. Not just because of its timelessness and its technological feats considering the hardware and software available to developers at the time, but because its community is still a thriving and incredibly creative force that is showing no signs of stopping any time soon.

I for one am definitely not going to stop loving it, or making maps of my own for it, at any point in the near (or distant) future.

Cacoward

Also I done won a Cacoward. This was for my 32-map single player mapset “Jenesis“. This is the first Cacoward I’ve won for a project of my own (although I’ve contributed music and the occasional map to a few community-made projects which also won awards in previous editions). Still, this is a pretty happy moment for me. Jenesis took me since October of last year to complete and only hit the archives at the end of November this year. Yep, more than a years’ worth of on/off work, bugtesting, finetuning and the occasional hiatus went into this project. Of course, not all of this year’s Cacoward winners took that long to complete (in fact, Khorus’ 32-map project took him exactly a month), so I guess my next goal is too see if I can pump out something of equal quality within a shorter amount of time. Hopefully I’ll release something to match or even outdo Jenesis in 2012. Possibly even that friggin’ Chip’s Challenge remake I’ve been sitting on for a while now.